Information About Make-Up Days

Due to the inclement weather last week and the successive days of closing school, we have received some questions about make-up days. We have also discovered that a communication last year may have created some confusion. We think we have found the post that seems to have created the questions and confusion regarding make-up days in the Oak Hills Local School District. The post follows with an explanation:

2014-2015 School Year Calendar Revision (March 2014)

The Oak Hills Local School District Board of Education has approved a revised 2014-­15 school year calendar.  Beginning with the 2014­-15 school year, the Ohio Department of Education will require public school districts to comply with minimum hours of instruction as opposed to minimum number of days each year.  Beginning with the 2014-­15 school year, the minimum hours of instruction for Ohio public school districts have been defined below:

  • Half-­day Kindergarten: ­ 455 hours per year
  • Grades K-­6: ­ 910 hours per year
  • Grades 7-­12: ­ 1,001 hours per year

This opportunity will allow the Oak Hills Local School District to provide a more focused professional development program for teachers and administrators. The teacher contract will remain at 185 work days (5 in­service days, 5 professional development days and 2 parent / teacher conference days). Hours of instruction for students will range from 476 hours for Kindergarten to 1,090 hours for high school students.  Five professional development days will replace all of the current  late start / early release days.  The State will no longer offercalamity days, only hours that fall below the state minimum will be required to be made up.

As you can see, the state minimum hours range from 455 – 1001 hours based on grade level. You will also see in this post that Oak Hills decided that the instructional hours for our students will remain approximately the same as in years past (476 – 1090 hours). Keep in mind, the state minimum hours are 14 -20 days less than what we provided in past years. While the State doesn’t require us to make up days until we’ve fallen below their minimum, our Board of Education has determined that the state minimum hours are not in the best educational interest of our students.

While students may like the idea, I hope we can all agree that another month off of school would not be in the best interest of our kids. We made the decision several months ago to use the traditional five calamity days that everyone was used to as our benchmark for this school year. In other words, we could close for five days before making any days up. Last Friday was our fifth day, hence the communication that should we miss any more days, the recommendation will be to make them up.

Now, because we are several days above the state minimum, we do have a lot more flexibility in how, and if we make up time. Here are some examples, none of which have been implemented:

  1. Make up a day, for a day, using the approved make-up schedule. (Staff and Students)
  2. Make up a day, for a day, using the approved make-up schedule. (Staff only)
  3. Add 30-90 minutes on to existing days until time is made up. (Staff and Students)
  4. Only make up the days we feel are needed.
  5. Don’t make up any days until we fall below the state minimum. That is 14-20 days less than in previous years.

Again, these are examples of the type of flexibility we now have in scheduling make-up days. However, we also recognize the desire for students, parents and staff to have an idea on possible make-up dates so that they can plan their personal lives. In addition, state law still requires us to approve five contingency days in our annual calendar.

Hopefully this information helps clear up some confusion. As reported earlier, if we miss any more days, we will be making them up based on the approved calendar or perhaps one of the options listed above.

We are not currently counting delayed-hours toward missed days.

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